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Latency-Sensitive 5G RAN Slicing for Industry 4.0

Title:
Latency-Sensitive 5G RAN Slicing for Industry 4.0
Authors:
García-Morales, Jan
Lucas-Estañ, M. Carmen
Gozalvez, Javier
Department:
Ingeniería de Comunicaciones
Issue Date:
2019-10-02
Abstract:
Network slicing is a novel 5G paradigm that exploits the virtualization and softwarization of networks to create different logical network instances over a common network infrastructure. Each instance is tailored for specific Quality of Service (QoS) profiles so that network slicing can simultaneously support several services with diverse requirements. Network slicing can be applied at the Core Network or at the Radio Access Network (RAN). RAN slicing is particularly relevant to support latency-sensitive or timecritical applications since the RAN accounts for a significant part of the end-to-end transmission latency. In this context, this study proposes a novel latency-sensitive 5G RAN slicing solution. The proposal includes schemes to design slices and partition (or allocate) radio resources among slices. These schemes are designed with the objective to satisfy both the rate and latency demands of diverse applications. In particular, this study considers applications with deterministic aperiodic, deterministic periodic and nondeterministic traffic. The latency-sensitive 5G RAN slicing proposal is evaluated in Industry 4.0 scenarios where stringent and/or deterministic latency requirements are common. However, it can be evolved to support other verticals with latency-sensitive or time-critical applications
Keywords/Subjects:
RAN slicing
network slicing
5G
Industry 4.0
latency-sensitive
ime-critical
deterministic
slices
creation
partitioning
allocation
radio resource management
optimization.
Type of document:
application/pdf
Access rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Appears in Collections:
Artículos



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