Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11000/4783

Roles of Amphipathicity and Hydrophobicity in the Micelle-Driven Structural Switch of a 14-mer Peptide Core from a Choline-Binding Repeat

Title:
Roles of Amphipathicity and Hydrophobicity in the Micelle-Driven Structural Switch of a 14-mer Peptide Core from a Choline-Binding Repeat
Authors:
Zamora Carreras, Héctor
Maestro García-Donas, Beatriz
Strandberg, Erik
Ulrich, Anne S.
Sanz, Jesús M.
Jiménez, M. Ángeles
Department:
Departamentos de la UMH::Bioquímica y Biología Molecular
Issue Date:
2018-03-15
Abstract:
Choline-binding repeats (CBRs) are ubiquitous sequences with a b-hairpin core that are found in the surface proteins of several microorganisms such as S. pneumoniae (pneumococcus). Previous studies on a 14-mer CBR sequence derived from the pneumoccal LytA autolysin (LytA239–252 peptide) have demonstrated a switch behaviour for this peptide, so that it acquires a stable, native-like bhairpin conformation in aqueous solution but is reversibly transformed into an amphipathic a-helix in the presence of detergent micelles. With the aim of understanding the factors responsible for this unusual b-hairpin to a-helix transition, and to specifically assess the role of peptide hydrophobicity and helical amphipathicity in the process, we designed a series of LytA239–252 variants affecting these two parameters and studied their interaction with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles by solution NMR, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies. Our results indicate that stabilising cross-strand interactions become essential for b-hairpin stability in the absence of optimal turn sequences. Moreover, both amphipathicity and hydrophobicity display comparable importance for helix stabilisation of CBR-derived peptides in micelles, indicating that these sequences represent a novel class of micelle/membrane-interacting peptides
Type of document:
application/pdf
Access rights:
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Appears in Collections:
Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular



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